KURDISTAN's MAPS

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1892

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



THE MAP OF KURDISH DELEGATION 1956

 

 

 

Klein - Asien - Kurdistan: Original Lithographie aus Hartleben´s Verlag, Wien, Pest, Leipzig, 1889.

Kartogr. Litho. Anstalt von G. Freytag & Berndt, Wien. Blattgröße ca. 28 x 40 cm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1886 Blackie-s Atlas Cyprus Kurdistan Mosul

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stieler1881-60

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


CURDISTAN 1787

 

 

 

 

Kurdistan's Proninces 1904:
DIYARBEKR
KERMANSHAN
LÛRISTAN
ERDELAN








 

 

 



1876
Large, Dated, Hand-Colored KURDISTAN Map & Asia Minor & Syria

including, Armenia; Aidin; Mughla; Konia; Angora; Siwas; Kastamuni; Bagdad; Cyprus and more.

This is a 130+ Year-Old Map--NOT a Reproduction, Most legends and place names are in the GERMAN language.

This map shows this area as it was organized in 1876.  There is an inset map of Smyrna and vicinity.

 

 

 

 

1900

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kurdistan's Provinces

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

KURDISTAN MAP (1897)

 

 

 

 

 

 

KURDISTAN MAP (1897)



 

 


 

CORDUENE (GORDION) - Where does the name Kurd come from?

The word kurti is from sumerian and means: "kur" means mountain/hill and "ti" means from. So it means the people from the mountains/hills. This word kurti is the oldest known word which describes the kurds from 3000 BC.

In 1923, English Orientalist Sir Godfrey Rolles Driver published a scientific research article "The Name Kurd and Its Philological Connexions". Driver, who was also an Assyriologist had tried to find who was the Qurti who had lived around the lake Van and with whom Assyrian warrior Tiglath-Pileser "I had fought" in ~1050 BC. 

Driver also tried to find the connection between Qurti and "the land of Karda" [Kardaka] text which was written on a Sumerian clay-tablet, of the third millennium B.C. Sumerians called the area around Lake Van a land of Karda. Driver examined the philological variations of Karda in different languages, such as Cordueni, Gordyeni, Kordyoui, Karduchi, Kardueni, Qardu, Kardaye, Qardawaye. He realized that all these names were actually the conversions of "Karda" in different languages. Also, he managed to connect all these names to the same area, Lake Van in contemporary Kurdistan. 

Sumerian called it the land of "Karda" (3000 BC)
Tiglath-Pileser I had fought against "Qurti" from the same area (1050 BC)
Greek historian Xenophon called people who lived around Lake Van a "Karduchi" people. He called the area a Corduene (400 BC)
Artakhshir, the founder of the Persian Sassanid dynasty fought against the "Madrig the King of Kurdan" in same area (226 AD)

Driver reaches a conclusion that the term Kurd wasn't used differently by different nations and roots of modern Kurds can be found from the ancient Corduene region. He also said that the root of ancient Kurds are very likely in the land of Kardas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

KURDISTAN MAP (Thomas Bois, CONNAISSANCE DES KURDES 1965)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1861

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An ORIGINAL 17th century map (1684)

******
CURDISTAN DIARBECK

by

Alain Manesson Mallet
German issue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hurrians

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wîlayet El Kerkûk Fî El Memleket-ul Kurdistan Fî El Memleket-ul Usmaniye: The map from 1893 - Ottoman era showing the Kurdish city Kirkuk = in the Autonom KURDISTAN Province

 

 

 


Map of Khorasan (Kurdistan)

 

 

 

1856 MAP of KURDISTAN SYRIA IRAQ CYPRUS ARMENIA

 

 

1917

 

 

Kurdistana Sor, LACHIN

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1869

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


1904

 

 

 

 

 

 

KURDISTAN's MAP 

ON THE GLOBS

 

 


 

 

 

 

The French diplomat Bernard Dorin drawing Kurdistan's map

 

 

 

THE MAP OF KURDISH DELEGATION 1956

 

 

KURDISH RARE BOOKS

 

 

 


Foundation For Kurdish Library & Museum